Brand New Site, Brand New Blog.

6 Aug

Last ever post on here. We’re moving house…

You may have gathered from the recent posts that we’ve been busy behind the scenes at Curated Place building a new home for everything we do. After 2 years of blogging on this site we’ve finally taken the leap and integrated the blog into the main production site over at www.curatedplace.com

You’ll find the blog under the news tab or you can simply use the URL http://www.curatedplace.com/blog/

Over on the new site you can find out about all of our latest projects like the North Atlantic Pavilion for Liverpool Biennial, the ever developing Secret Cities work with Andrew Brooks and the launch of CPR a new international residency programme for mid-career artists that will connect the UK with both the Middle East and the Nordic region.

You can even look back at some of our previous highlights like Hacienda 25: Fac491, Homegrown: The story of UK Hip Hop and The Modern Lesbian.

Please follow us over to our new home – its a lot comfier and we hope you’ll like it enough to tell a friend – they’re all welcome.

Supercritical Mass – International Residencies and innovation in the arts

5 Aug

Following our own positive experiences of residencies at the end of 2011 we started experimenting with a view to developing a Curated Place residency programme for artists wanting to work in the UK. Developing relationships with both venue and creative partners in Manchester we sought to introduce international talents to the North of England to both contribute to and learn from the strong arts sector here.

The Supercritical Mass projects of Australian artists Luke Jaaniste and Julian Day was a real highlight. Developed over two residency periods we initially hosted SuperCritical Mass for a mini-residency in November 2011. Working closely with the music department at the University of Salford and with the artists communities in Islington Mill we delivered a masterclass and artists talk to students before devising and delivering two performances in the University and in the nearby Peel Park.

This short 5 day residency was inspired by innovation development models of quick hit, low cost, managed risk projects and intended as a proof of concept performance. We very deliberately developed the format to develop the profile of the project for participants and funders alike. It worked.

Creating high quality documentation of the pilot which we could distribute widely and being able to very clearly state how we would scale the project up we received significant funding from Sound and Music to develop the second phase of the residency programme – hosting the artists for two weeks as part of the FutureEverything festival 2012 to deliver one of the most ambitious Supercritical Mass projects to date – a vocal performance at Manchester Cathedral.

A huge success for artists, participants and audiences alike we were able to learn a lot about how high-quality residency programmes can be delivered in the UK and we’re now in a position to expand our own residency programme to become a more formal international artist exchange – but with a twist. Rather than simply inviting artists to work in a creative vacuum we’ll be insisting that visiting artists work in collaboration with local participants who will then make a reciprocal residency visit to our international partners to develop the projects on an international platform.

Tomorrow we’ll be formally launching the new Curated Place site which will outline the programme and how it will work. If you’re a mid-career artist, with experience of exhibitions and commissions in the UK and interested in participating sign up to our Facebook and Twitter feeds for the latest and for ways to apply when we launch.

British Council Cultural Leadership International Programme – building international links and inspiring a new Curated Place residency programme

2 Aug

In October 2011 I was lucky enough to be taken to Istanbul by the British Council as part of their CLI programme.  From over 180 applications seven of us from the UK were taken to Turkey with the aim “to engage the new generation of cultural leaders around the world in the discussion and development of common strategies to tackle global cultural issues”.

The seven of us taken from the UK were Haidee Bell, Innovation Programmes Manager, Creative Economy, NESTADaniel Gorman, Director, Firefly InternationalRohan Gunatillake, Lead Producer, Edinburgh Festivals Innovation Lab, (now Sync) ; Karena Johnson, CEO/Artistic Director, The BroadwayLaura McDermott, Joint Artistic Director, Fierce FestivalElhum Shakerifar,  Creative Producer, Postcode Films; and me

The programme revolved around two key areas: management and leadership development. On the one hand the programme focussed on developing core cultural management skills of participants, through quite traditional seminars and workshops. However, where most people found most benefit was through the chance to get to know their peers – all emerging cultural leaders looking to develop their international exposure and experience.

Alongside my participation in the programme Curated Place also sent out a documentation crew to capture the ideas behind the events.  Again we sought not simply to capture digital footage that was relevant only to people around the immediate time of the events but to interrogate the experience and knowledge of those involved in the programme – both presenters and the remarkable CLI participants.

By filming more intimate discussions with interviewees, instead of simply capturing raw footage of scripted conference presentations, we wanted to get a personal insight into the professional worlds of those in and around the CLI programme – creating a resource that would give longer term insight into what connections could be made from the programme across international arts communities rather than just those within the room.  By ensuring these videos and that knowledge was available to anyone with an internet connection we aimed to dramatically increase the impact of the programme and the longevity of the investment made over the week of the programme.

Later this year as part of the programme I’ll be travelling to the middle east to establish new reciprocal residency programmes for UK artists and curators to develop collaborative projects with local artists at a similar point in their career – seeking to extend their creative horizons out of the regional and national to an international programme.  All of it building on the insight and relationships started by CLI in Istanbul.  More on this next week…but if you’re desperate to know follow us on Facebook and Twitter to hear the latest.

From Counting Sheep to Finnegan’s Wake: The Dawn Of Digital Thinking – micro documentary and live events

1 Aug


Something a bit more digital from the Curated Place archive – a piece we developed off the back of our work on the 2011 Future Everything festival.

Wanting to get away from dry documentation of events that so often ends up as digital landfill, lacking impact after the event, we developed an idea for series of films taking highlights of the festival into an abstract micro-documentary format that would prime our audiences for the next festival.

Giving a teasing insight into the artwork showcased at the preceding festival and synopsising the ideas that were discussed, we developed a format for a marketing campaign that was built around a series of five short interlinked films – each of a duration that responded to how people actually digest digital media.  By building a story about the broader impact and concept of the festival we aimed to create a sense of anticipation around 2012 using more than just advertising budget alone.  Simultaneously we wanted to create a more usable resource from the footage captured in previous incarnations of the conference by giving some order and rationale to the archive and presenting a way in to the often jargon-filled world of digital culture.

The first film featured highlights from interviews carried out with Chris Speed and Bill Thompson exploring the dawn of digital thinking and the impacts for society as a whole. Far from just been about the technology it shows how the digital revolution changes how we think, act and relate to one another. Although abstract the teaser film was linked to the source interviews – all carried out with a clear vision and purpose as part of a medium-term strategic plan to develop the documentation and distribution of the festival’s resources – along with a curated digital resource pack.

Although only ever rolled out as a pilot/proof of concept at Future Everything we’ve now developed a solid format for for turning the documentation of one-off events into a resource that reaches beyond established audiences and will be something you’ll be able to see us extend on the new Curated Place site (from Monday) around our work on this year’s Liverpool Biennial.


An example of the source footage from Chris Speed where he expands his ideas outlined in the micro-doc. We wanted to hook people in with a brief film then give them access to more in-depth content.

Secret City Zoetermeer: Crane troubles

31 Jul


A short clip from our adventures during “Secret City Zoetermeer” with Andrew Brooks in 2011.

Joined by Coert Gummels from our hosts Stadsmuseum Zoetermeer we were shown around the Van Omme & De Groot Oosterheem development on the north east edge of the city.  All was going fine as we headed up the 85m tower crane until things get a little hairy around 3.55…

Worth it for this shot though:

The Truth: The Story of UK Hip Hop (full documentary)

30 Jul

Later this week we’ll be launching the new Curated Place website.  To celebrate we’ll be posting some of our highlights from past productions, starting with “The Truth” a film made with director Teddy Nygh for our 2009 exhibition “Homegrown”.

The brief was simple – make the most comprehensive documentary covering the development of UK Hip Hop from its origins to today told by the people that created the scene.  The result is a film that brings together legendary names of the UK scene – from Saxon Sounds through Rodney P, Roots Manuva to Giggs and Sway all telling their part in the story that makes up a uniquely British music and a uniquely British culture.

Introduction to Contemporary Visual Art: Beyond the Counterculture | Cornerhouse

4 Jan

“Please note: This course will make use of visual imagery which some may find offensive.”

There’s a reason to go if any.

Thanks to the publishers of the British leftfield arts magazine Nude, Cornerhouse is hosting this new 6 week course that will explore artistic notions of counterculture with reference to the visual legacy of some of the most quietly influential subcultures and underground youth movements since the early 1960s.

Book now to avoid disappointment and start the new year finding out about the art of the Pin-Up, Surf and Kustom Culture, Psychedelia,  underground Comix, the Tiki revival, punk graphics, lowbrow art, Pop Surrealism, designer toys and indie crafting, touching upon the work of Ed Roth, Robert Williams, Shag, Coop, Kozik, Jamie Reid and James Cauty .

Cornerhouse: The Annexe

Mon 16 Jan 2012 – Mon 20 Feb 2012

18:30 – 20:30, 6 weeks

£60 full/£45 concs

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